Michael Messina

Apr 16

(via Top Ten Roadblocks to Public Participation – Michael Messina)

(via Top Ten Roadblocks to Public Participation – Michael Messina)

Jan 24

Convention crowd, Chicago (LOC) by The Library of Congress on Flickr.
Photo taken at the 1912 Republican National Convention held at the Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, June 18-22.  (Source: Flickr Commons project, 2008) Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Convention crowd, Chicago (LOC) by The Library of Congress on Flickr.

Photo taken at the 1912 Republican National Convention held at the Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, June 18-22.

(Source: Flickr Commons project, 2008)
Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Jan 18

Roots of Crowdsourcing – Collective Intelligence and Crowd Wisdom by Michael Messina

Photo via Flickr (permission granted) by user gerag © 2008 All Rights Reserved

Roots of Crowdsourcing – Collective Intelligence and Crowd Wisdom by Michael Messina

Photo via Flickr (permission granted) by user gerag © 2008 All Rights Reserved

Jan 17

“It’s also possible for groups of people to work together in ways that seem pretty stupid, and I think collective stupidity is just as possible as collective intelligence. Part of what I want to understand and part of what the people I’m working with want to understand is what are the conditions that lead to collective intelligence rather than collective stupidity.” —

Tom Malone, professor of Management at MIT’s Sloan School.

MIT Sloan is conducting an interesting study about collective intelligence and organizations. Does collective intelligence really exist?

(via tiagodoria)

Jan 14

Lexington, MA - if only every town had a bike path!

Lexington, MA - if only every town had a bike path!

Jan 10

Boston’s Old Court House and the site of the City’s first prison.

Boston’s Old Court House and the site of the City’s first prison.

Jan 08

(via Notes on Public Participation)

(via Notes on Public Participation)

Nov 10

Malden Square in 1917, looking down Pleasant Street
Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection

Malden Square in 1917, looking down Pleasant Street

Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection

Map of Malden, MA (1795) by Peter Tufts
Courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library

Map of Malden, MA (1795) by Peter Tufts

Courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library

Oct 27

Cutting Down Beacon Hill to Fill Mill Pond - Boston, MA (1811)Workers from the Mill Pond Corporation shovel dirt and gravel from Beacon Hill to be hauled away by horses to fill in the stenchy Mill Pond Cove, otherwise known today as the Bulfinch Triangle, named after Charles Bulfinch. Few individuals influenced the development of Boston like Charles Bulfinch. He was a “triple threat” as an architect, entrepreneur and the chief town official of his day. And essentially he was Boston’s first urban planner (Kennedy). In the background is the Massachusetts State House, designed by Bulfinch in his signature Federal style, completed in 1798.
The Mill Cove project was the first of many landfill projects in Boston and it added over 50 acres of land to the city. The filling of Mill Pond began around 1807 and took just over 20 years to fill. Over 16% or one-sixth of Boston is built on landfill. And Boston probably has more made land than any city in North America (Seasholes).
Image by Flux.books at en.wikipedia [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons.

Cutting Down Beacon Hill to Fill Mill Pond - Boston, MA (1811)

Workers from the Mill Pond Corporation shovel dirt and gravel from Beacon Hill to be hauled away by horses to fill in the stenchy Mill Pond Cove, otherwise known today as the Bulfinch Triangle, named after Charles Bulfinch. Few individuals influenced the development of Boston like Charles Bulfinch. He was a “triple threat” as an architect, entrepreneur and the chief town official of his day. And essentially he was Boston’s first urban planner (Kennedy). In the background is the Massachusetts State House, designed by Bulfinch in his signature Federal style, completed in 1798.

The Mill Cove project was the first of many landfill projects in Boston and it added over 50 acres of land to the city. The filling of Mill Pond began around 1807 and took just over 20 years to fill. Over 16% or one-sixth of Boston is built on landfill. And Boston probably has more made land than any city in North America (Seasholes).

Image by Flux.books at en.wikipedia [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons.